Explain the reason for reviewing the Easter forecast

Explain the reason for reviewing the Easter forecast

Video: Explaining why Easter forecasts have been revised

With meteorologist Mike Wankom Mike. Well, I’ll tell you, we’ve got new data, which really makes us reevaluate. How much snow are we going to get out of this system. What’s happening is that the storm is now finally forming, which means we’re getting a better idea of ​​what the data looks like and where this storm is being tracked. The National Weather Service has actually started to cut back on some of these things. So, instead of being a winter storm warning, it’s now a winter weather warning. And this is why. Let me show you what happened with the computer models we’re talking about. First, let me give you a timing. We won’t see anything happen until we arrive tomorrow morning. This is when we will get a rain-snow mix. We then shift into full snowfall territory and stay with us as we head through the afternoon. But look at this. See how the snow doesn’t really appear here. Even this area does not appear as heavy as it used to. Until this morning. That’s why, when I looked at some computer models, I found that something had changed dramatically. What happened? If you look at the European model, look at what he did. We have been witnessing this transformation since yesterday. Yesterday we started talking about how the center is shifting more and more towards the south and look what happened with the Europeans. It’s heading south. Now, one of our high-resolution models still retains some overall values. But notice how it is cut this way. So when I put it all together, this is what I think about. now. It reduced the total significantly. I think we’ll see some heavier totals here, but it may be more so in parts of Connecticut and Rhode Island. And of course, on the coast, we have this constant mixing. Obviously we’re getting new data every moment, and I’ll be awake

Video: Explaining why Easter forecasts have been revised

New computer guidance suggests some major cities in Massachusetts may avoid the greatest impact from easterly winds that will move up the East Coast, but strong winds, power outages and treacherous travel will still be a concern.

New computer guidance suggests some major cities in Massachusetts may avoid the greatest impact from easterly winds that will move up the East Coast, but strong winds, power outages and treacherous travel will still be a concern.

(Tags for translation)Snow Forecast

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