How to survive a heat wave

How to survive a heat wave

This summer is already off to a very hot start with many areas across the United States experiencing excessive heat. That feeling when someone opens the oven and you just wait *** a second and the heat wave hits here, it’s kind of the feeling we get when we walk outside. Heat waves are here to stay this summer. But why does it happen? How can we prevent them and how can we survive them? The word “heatwave” gets thrown around a lot but don’t let it fool you. Heat waves are much more than typical hot summer weather. They are actually a type of natural disaster and are marked by an extended period with abnormally high temperatures usually above 90 degrees. When a high pressure system moves in ***, it can pull hot air into the ground, heating the area below the system. This creates a hot bubble that prevents wind and clouds from moving, heating the area further. It will eventually collapse or be blown away by strong winds, but that could take days to make matters worse. The average global temperature has risen by 1.8 F since the 19th century. This means that heat waves are set to become more frequent, last longer, and more intense. You see droughts, you see heat waves, extreme events becoming more extreme, the climate warming, as a result of human activity, the increase in human-produced greenhouse gases actually causes an increase in heat and temperature between 4016,100 and and another 25 million people are exposed to heat waves. Globally, heat waves can create the perfect environment for other natural disasters such as drought and wildfires that can lead to more death and destruction. Heat waves aren’t just uncomfortable pain. They are truly dangerous and it is estimated that nationwide heat is responsible for 235,000 emergency department visits and 56,000 hospital admissions. Adding about $1 billion in health care costs every summer. Heat waves are often underestimated as dangerous weather phenomena because they are less dramatic than floods or wildfires, but they can be just as deadly. The human body does a delicate dance to make sure it stays warm inside. Normal temperature ranges from 97 to 99 F. When it gets too hot, every organ in the body works to cool it down. The heart in particular works over time to pump its hot blood away from the internal organs and closer to the surface of the skin until it cools. This puts a lot of stress on him and can endanger those who already have heart problems. This can lead to heat stroke, heat exhaustion, or even complete organ failure and death. Like many climate-related health issues, it is not a fair fighter. Heat waves disproportionately affect older people, black people, and people with pre-existing health conditions. Extreme heat also hits infrastructure, affecting everyone around it. The heat can jam and overwhelm power lines, leading to power outages. It can bring railway operations to a screeching halt and can deteriorate concrete structures, making them more vulnerable to damage. It also affects crops and livestock with the potential to destroy food supplies. Heat makes *** a deadly competitor. So, how can people cope this summer? Preparation is key before a heat wave is planned. Identify great areas in your community that you can stay in if your home isn’t a suitable place like the local *** library or ** mall are good options. Make sure to install air conditioning if possible, and cover your windows with curtains when the heatwave passes. Make sure to take things seriously and stay out of the sun whenever possible. Go outside only in the morning or evening to avoid the hottest parts of the day, stay hydrated, head to the shade, wear light, loose-fitting clothing and take a cool shower. Most importantly, you must learn to recognize the signs of heat illness. In heat stroke, there are headaches, confusion and nausea, and in heat exhaustion, there is weakness, heavy sweating and clammy skin during a heat wave. It is very important to take care of yourself and others around you, including pets and neighbors, so don’t stress yourself out and just wait for it to pass.

How to beat a heat wave

As heat waves become more severe and frequent, it’s important to know how to protect yourself and your neighbors this summer

This summer has already gotten off to a scorching hot start, with Earth recording four record hot days in early July. Heatwaves are already a staple of our summers, but they are expected to become more frequent and intense. A heat wave is defined as a prolonged period of abnormally high temperatures, usually above 90 degrees Fahrenheit. It occurs when a high air pressure system moves over an area and pulls hot air downward. The system prevents wind and clouds from moving and provides comfort, thus increasing the temperature of the area more. It eventually collapses or is blown away by strong winds, but this may take several days. Climate change is making matters worse, leading to more frequent, intense and longer heatwaves. In the years 2000 to 2016, an additional 125 million people were exposed to heat waves. How does it affect people? The human body constantly monitors our temperature and keeps it within an accurate range of 97-99 degrees Fahrenheit. When it gets too hot, the whole body works hard to lower the temperature. The heart works specifically to pump warm blood to the surface of the body to cool. This can be stressful for those with heart problems and can eventually lead to cardiac arrest, heat exhaustion, and even organ failure and death. Unfortunately, it does not affect everyone equally, but disproportionately challenges older adults, those with pre-existing conditions and Black people. Heat waves are not only deadly to people, but they can damage infrastructure. The heat can damage power lines, making them less efficient and potentially causing power outages. It can also paralyze agriculture and livestock, leading to shortages in food supplies. How to beat the heat Before a heat wave reaches your area, you can prepare yourself: Identify cool areas in your area where you can spend time, such as a mall or library. Outfit your windows with blinds and blinds, invest in air conditioning if possible, or look for potential financing to help. When the heat arrives, follow this advice: Take it easy and don’t overexert yourself. Go outside only in the morning and evening in the coolest parts of the day. Stay hydrated when you seek shade outside. Wear loose, lightweight clothing. Take a cool shower. Learn to recognize Signs of heat illness. In heatstroke, there is confusion, nausea, and headache. In heat exhaustion, there is excessive sweating, clammy skin, and weakness. How can we prevent heat waves? While climate change will make heat waves worse, there are some solutions to make heat waves more manageable. Local governments can provide access to cooling centers for residents who do not have access to cold spaces. Investing in urban tree planting can help improve shade and reduce the urban heat island effect. Cool pavements and smart infrastructure can also help increase reflectivity and reduce heat. Ultimately, reducing the burning of fossil fuels will be the only real solution to preventing heat waves.

This summer has already gotten off to a very hot start, with… Earth records four record days Heat in early July. Heatwaves are already a staple of our summers, but they are expected to become more frequent and intense.

A heat wave is defined as a prolonged period of abnormally high temperatures, usually above 90 degrees Fahrenheit. It occurs when a high air pressure system moves over an area and pulls hot air downward. The system prevents wind and clouds from moving and provides comfort, thus increasing the temperature of the area more. It eventually collapses or is blown away by strong winds, but this may take several days.

Climate change is making matters worse, leading to more frequent, intense and longer heatwaves. In the years 2000 to 2016, an additional 125 million people were exposed to heat waves.

How does it affect people?

The human body constantly monitors our temperature and keeps it within an accurate range of 97-99 degrees Fahrenheit. When it gets too hot, the whole body works hard to lower the temperature. The heart works specifically to pump warm blood to the surface of the body to cool. This can be stressful for those with heart problems and can eventually lead to cardiac arrest, heat exhaustion, and even organ failure and death. Unfortunately, it does not affect everyone equally, but disproportionately challenges older adults, those with pre-existing conditions and Black people.

Heat waves are not only deadly to people, but they can damage infrastructure. The heat can damage power lines, making them less efficient and potentially causing power outages. It could also paralyze agriculture and livestock, leading to food supply shortages.

How to beat the heat

Before the heat wave reaches your area, you can prepare yourself:

  • Identify cool areas in your neighborhood where you can spend time, like the mall or library.
  • Cover windows with curtains and curtains
  • Invest in or research an air conditioner if possible Potential financing for help.

When the heat hits, follow this advice:

  • Take it easy and don’t stress yourself
  • Only go out in the morning and evening during the coolest parts of the day
  • Stay hydrated
  • When outside, seek shade
  • Wear loose, lightweight clothing
  • Take a cold shower
  • Learn how to recognize the signs of heat illness. In heatstroke, there is confusion, nausea, and headache. In heat exhaustion, there is excessive sweating, clammy skin, and weakness

How can we prevent heat waves?

While climate change will make heat waves worse, there are some solutions to make heat waves more manageable.

Local governments can provide access to cooling centers for residents who do not have access to cooling spaces. Investing in urban tree planting can help improve shade and reduce the urban heat island effect. Cool pavements and smart infrastructure can also help increase reflectivity and reduce heat.

Ultimately, reducing the burning of fossil fuels will be the only real solution to preventing heat waves.

(Tags for translation) Climate change

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