Hurricane Watch vs. Hurricane Warning: What's the Difference?

Hurricane Watch vs. Hurricane Warning: What's the Difference?

It is valid until 3:00. Yes, so we'll carry the clock to the afternoon. And just so you guys understand what we mean when we say “watch” versus “warning.” With a watch, you need to be prepared, and keep in mind where you need to go just in case conditions take a turn for the worse. Now, when they take that turn for the worse, we have an active warning in place. You need to get to your shelter area. A lot of times, this is the lowest level of your house, or your basement, if you have a bungalow or a first floor, just make sure you're away from any doors, windows or electrical outlets where flying debris can get hit and we can get blown away. Some spark electricity towards those outlets as well. There are no warnings at the moment, but we have h

Understand the difference between tornado watches and warnings

RELATED: Tornado watch issued for most of Central Florida on Thursday The NWS often issues watches and warnings to alert residents about severe weather and when to take shelter. So, what exactly distinguishes the two, and how should you prepare? Severe Thunderstorm Watch vs. Warning: The NWS announces a Severe Thunderstorm Watch when weather conditions are favorable for severe thunderstorms to develop. Keep an eye on the skies and download the WESH 2 News app to be aware of alerts, listen to NOAA Weather Radio, or listen to WESH 2 News when severe weather is imminent. A severe thunderstorm warning is issued by the NWS when spotters report severe weather or radar data indicates its presence. Warnings indicate an immediate threat to the life and property of those in the path of the storm. Hurricane Watch vs. Warning: A hurricane watch is issued by nuclear-weapon states when weather conditions in an area indicate an increased risk of severe weather capable of producing a hurricane. The NWS issues a tornado warning when a tornado is observed or detected by weather radar. A warning means that you should seek shelter without delay. Prepare before a storm arrives: When severe weather is on the horizon, stay vigilant, make sure your cell phone is charged, and take proactive steps to save lives and protect property during severe weather events. You have multiple ways to receive alerts. Download the WESH 2 News app to stay aware of alerts, listen to NOAA Weather Radio, or listen to WESH 2 News when severe weather is imminent. You can also download the FEMA app (available in English and Spanish) to receive real-time emergency notifications from the National Weather Service and locate a nearby shelter. Pay close attention to local warnings and follow safety instructions provided by local authorities. Make sure your emergency kit is well stocked and includes non-perishable food, cash, chargers, flashlights and batteries in case of a power outage. Take into account any special needs you or your family members may have. Seniors and individuals with disabilities may need extra help preparing for the storm. Visit Ready.gov/older-adults and for individuals with disabilities for additional tips and information. Don't ignore your pets' needs. Since many shelters do not accommodate household pets, be sure to make a plan and prepare the necessary supplies for your animals. Check on your neighbors. As you prepare your family and loved ones for disaster, also check with your neighbors within your community to see if they are taking similar precautions or if they could use help getting started. Prepare your property for inclement weather by removing any large or loose materials. Get rid of dead trees, overhanging branches, and unsafe objects in your garden or yard that could pose a hazard during high winds. Make an emergency plan with your family using the “Make a Plan” form. You can easily save an electronic copy or share it with other family members. Stay with WESH 2 online and on air for the most accurate weather forecasts in Central Florida. Radar severe weather alerts

RELATED: A tornado watch was issued for most of Central Florida on Thursday

The NWS often issues watches and warnings to alert residents about severe weather and when to take shelter. So, what exactly is different between the two, and how should you prepare?

Severe Thunderstorm Watch vs. Warning:
The NWS announces a Severe Thunderstorm Watch when weather conditions are favorable for severe thunderstorms to develop. Watch the sky and download Wish 2 news app To be aware of alerts, listen to NOAA Weather Radio, or listen to WESH 2 News when severe weather is imminent.

A severe thunderstorm warning is issued by the NWS when spotters report severe weather or radar data indicates its presence. Warnings indicate an immediate threat to the lives and property of those in the path of the storm.

Hurricane Watch vs. Warning:
A tornado watch is issued by the NWS when weather conditions in an area indicate an increased risk of severe weather capable of producing a tornado.

The NWS issues a tornado warning when a tornado is observed or detected by weather radar. A warning means that you should seek shelter without delay.

tornado

Preparing before the storm arrives:
When severe weather is on the horizon, be vigilant, make sure your cell phone is charged, and take proactive steps to save lives and protect property during severe weather events.

  • You have multiple ways to receive alerts. download Wish 2 news app To be aware of alerts, listen to NOAA Weather Radio, or listen to WESH 2 News when severe weather is imminent. You can also download the FEMA app (available in English and Spanish) to receive real-time emergency notifications from the National Weather Service and locate a nearby shelter.
  • Pay close attention to local warnings and follow safety instructions provided by local authorities.
  • Make sure your emergency kit is well stocked and includes non-perishable foods, cash, chargers, flashlights and batteries in case of a power outage.
  • Take into account any special needs you or your family members may have. Seniors and individuals with disabilities may need extra help preparing for the storm. Visit Ready.gov/older-adults and for individuals with disabilities for additional tips and information.
  • Don't ignore your pets' needs. Since many shelters do not accommodate household pets, be sure to make a plan and provide the necessary supplies for your animals.
  • Check on your neighbors. As you prepare your family and loved ones for disaster, also look to your neighbors within your community to see if they are taking similar precautions or if they could use help getting started.
  • Prepare your property for inclement weather by removing any large or loose materials. Get rid of dead trees, overhanging branches, and loose objects in your garden or yard that could pose a hazard during high winds.
  • Formulate an emergency plan with your family using the Make a Plan form. You can easily save an electronic copy or share it with other family members.

Stay with WESH 2 online and on air for the most accurate weather forecasts in Central Florida.

(tags to translate) Emergency Storm Plan

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