The weather in Texas this weekend includes snow for some, and storms for the rest of us

The weather in Texas this weekend includes snow for some, and storms for the rest of us

Left, future weather radar shows heavy snow in the Texas Panhandle on Sunday morning. At right, the Storm Prediction Center’s forecast for Sunday shows a level of 2 out of 5 for the risk of severe thunderstorms. At this level of risk, isolated but short-lived storms are possible.

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A low pressure system will provide power for a variety of weather hazards throughout Texas. In the Panhandle, it will interact with a cold winter air mass to produce heavy snow. To the south, low pressure will interact with deep atmospheric moisture coming from the Gulf of Mexico. This will produce severe thunderstorms in Austin, San Antonio, Houston and far eastern Texas.

Dealing with snow

Confidence is growing in a major snow event across the Texas Panhandle. The National Weather Service office in Amarillo has issued a winter storm watch for several counties, warning that the area could get between 3 and 8 inches of snow. Snow will be possible in isolated areas where heavier snowpacks are moving.

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The Panhandle will likely see rain on Saturday, but temperatures will drop below freezing on Sunday, allowing for a transition to snow. Heavy snow is expected to fall between 5am and 10pm on Sunday.

The central and southern Panhandle has the best chance for very heavy snow. This includes the cities of Amarillo, Hereford, Plainview and Clarendon. To the south, snow is still possible in Lubbock, but accumulations will likely be less than 3 inches. Farther east, Wichita Falls could see light snow accumulations as well.

Wind speeds are expected to range from 20 to 30 mph Sunday through Monday morning. This will bring wind temperatures into the single digits and teens across the Panhandle.

Shown here are wind chill values ​​expected across North Texas late Sunday night into early Monday morning.  Wind chills are expected to reach single digits and teens are expected in the Texas Panhandle.

Shown here are wind chill values ​​expected across North Texas late Sunday night into early Monday morning. Wind chills are expected to reach single digits and teens are expected in the Texas Panhandle.

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Severe thunderstorms

Severe thunderstorms will be possible Saturday and Sunday across the Lone Star State. The overall threat of severe weather is lower on Saturday, but will increase on Sunday as a low pressure system approaches. Here’s what you should know:

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Saturday: The Weather Service’s Storm Prediction Center issued a level of 1 out of 5 for severe weather risk for an area that includes San Antonio, Austin, Houston and the Hill Country. At this level of risk, afternoon storms could produce severe hail and damaging wind gusts, and an isolated tornado is unlikely but not unlikely.

However, no severe weather is expected on Saturday. The Weather Service defines severe weather as storms that produce winds of 58 mph or stronger, at least an inch in diameter, or a tornado.

Instead, only a few of the strongest storms will be able to produce severe weather. The majority of storms will remain below severe weather thresholds.

Late Saturday night: Between 9pm Saturday and 3am Sunday, a secondary batch of strong to severe storms will be possible in this area. These storms will likely be stronger than the afternoon thunderstorms. West Texas, the Hill Country, and areas toward Austin and Waco are likely to be affected overnight.

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Sunday: The highest severe weather threat will continue until late Sunday morning and into the afternoon. Areas at greatest risk will be along and east of Interstate 35, including Waco, Houston, Lufkin, Tyler and Nacogdoches. The Storm Prediction Center has issued a level 2 out of 5 severe storm risk for far eastern Texas. At this level of risk, isolated but short-lived severe storms are possible.

There is a greater risk of large hailstones in East Texas, some the size of golf balls. Damaging winds and some tornadoes are also possible.

Stay weather aware and up to date with local severe weather warnings. After 3 to 4 p.m., storms will move east into Louisiana and Mississippi, ending the threat of severe storms in Texas.

(Tags for translation)National Weather Service

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