Track active weather with NOAA's new radar viewer

Track active weather with NOAA's new radar viewer

Meteorologists rely on weather radar to see developing storms, and now you can, too.

NOAA's new Interactive Radar Viewer web page with expanded radar data will allow you to monitor the type and movement of precipitation from the sky. Looking at several radar images over a period of time — or a Radar ring – It can provide clues about where and how quickly rain or snow falls. The radar loop can also help show if danger is increasing or decreasing in an area or if it is becoming more severe; It can also see rainfall in the dark or when it is cloudy.

Radar can track rain and snow and see potential flash floods

On the new page, radar data can be layered with National Weather Service watches, warnings and forecasts, and displayed on a dynamic map that allows for zooming and panning. We also provide radar images more frequently and with four times higher resolution than before. Weather radar can track rain and snow and see the potential for flash floods.

Additionally: The new GIS-based web page provides radar data in a more flexible format, so emergency managers can integrate that data into their situational awareness databases to help them make local decisions.

NOAA's new Radar Viewer webpage can be saved to your mobile device's home screen just like an app, so you can use this powerful weather monitoring tool on the go. (Noah Noos)

The radar web page can be saved to your mobile device's home screen just like an app, so you can use this powerful weather monitoring tool on the go.

Other improvements include:

  • Access to some dual-polarization radar products to help differentiate between types of precipitation, such as rain and snow;

  • More radar data, including 159 NEXRAD Doppler radars and 45 Terminal Doppler weather radars. At times when one radar is out of service, you still have coverage due to overlapping radar beams;

  • Ability to customize data for any field, data layer preferences can be saved or bookmarked;

  • Radar animation loops can be saved, shared and used on social media;

  • The new page infrastructure allows for easy integration of new datasets, such as satellite images, in the future; And

  • The web page is more reliable now because it runs on an operationally supported system 24/7.

We added new features to the Radar Viewer based on the feedback we received from the general community and emergency management. Be sure to check out these video tutorials and FAQs to help you get started using the site.

Got a radar? What to do now: Grab your mobile device and head to Rader.weather.gov.

(tags for translation) Weather

You may also like...

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *