Valentine’s Day is next week. Here are the forecasts for date night

Valentine’s Day is next week.  Here are the forecasts for date night

Valentine’s Day is right around the corner and there are plenty of romantic places around Houston to take that special someone, but should you plan an outdoor adventure or look for something indoors to escape the elements?

After a wet weekend, the start of next week will be dry and cool, with clear skies and light winds. However, scattered showers may occur on Valentine’s Day due to some disturbances in the Pacific airflow over Mexico and south Texas. As of now, Houston is expected to remain dry, but it’s always a good idea to keep an eye on the forecast because the possibility of rain is still around the corner.

A weather disturbance will likely move over Mexico and into Texas by the middle of next week with some rain possible in South Texas.

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As for temperatures, Valentine’s Day morning temperatures will be near 50 degrees, but afternoon highs will be in the low 60s. If you want to treat your sweetie to a coffee date at sunrise, it will appear on the horizon at 7:02 AM. If you’d rather enjoy a stunning Texas sunset at the “Twilight Epiphany” Skyspace on the Rice University campus, be ready and in place by 6:09 p.m.

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Temperatures in Houston on February 14 range, on average, from 46°C to a high of 66°C, but they can vary greatly from year to year. The National Weather Service found that temperatures below freezing in February occur about once every nine years in College Station and once every 12 years in the Houston area. Although the coast usually escapes subzero temperatures by mid-February, an occasional cold snap can still occur.

Warmest Valentine's Day in Houston since record keeping began in the late 1800s.  As recently as February 14, 2023, the temperature was 80 degrees, ranking fourth on the list.

Warmest Valentine’s Day in Houston since record keeping began in the late 1800s. As recently as February 14, 2023, the temperature was 80 degrees, ranking fourth on the list.

Roberto Villalpando – National Weather Service

The coldest Valentine's Day in Houston since record keeping began in the late 1800s.  Recently, February 14, 2021, was one of the coldest days with a minimum temperature of 26 degrees, ranking fourth.

The coldest Valentine’s Day in Houston since record keeping began in the late 1800s. Recently, February 14, 2021, was one of the coldest days with a minimum temperature of 26 degrees, ranking fourth.

Roberto Villalpando – National Weather Service

However, one constant of Valentine’s Day is the frequency of rain. According to the National Weather Service, one or more traces of rain fall about once every three years in College Station and Galveston, and about every two years in Houston.

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The worst snowstorm ever recorded on the upper Texas Gulf Coast occurred from February 12 to 15, 1895, when 10 to 20 inches of snow fell from Freeport to Beaumont. Houston officially reported 20 inches of snow while Galveston recorded 15 inches.

The photo was taken on February 15, 1895, outside Houston City Hall on Market Square.  Snow began falling at 8pm on February 14, and fell for 24 hours.  Snowfall depths downtown ranged from 18 inches to more than 2 feet.

The photo was taken on February 15, 1895, outside Houston City Hall on Market Square. Snow began falling at 8pm on February 14, and fell for 24 hours. Snowfall depths downtown ranged from 18 inches to more than 2 feet.

Houston Chronicle Files

Rainy Valentine’s Days in Houston:

  1. 1895: 1.9 inches (equivalent to 20 inches of snowfall)
  2. 1944: 1.3 inches
  3. 1969: 1.29 inches
  4. 1959: 1.24 inches
  5. 1909, 1942: 0.96 inches

We also remember the freeze of February 2021. The ice, snow, and arctic air arrived on Valentine’s Day weekend. However, last year we recorded highs of 80 degrees, lows of 60 and 0.03 inches of rain.

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We still have several more days to adjust this forecast, but Valentine’s Day could turn rainy, especially if a Pacific storm system accelerates or shifts northward from Mexico to southeast Texas. The forecast from the Weather Service’s Climate Prediction Center for the next six to 10 days is trending toward this very scenario with the potential for wetter and cooler weather.

Whether you’re taking your loved one to the Rosemont Love Lock Bridge over Allen Parkway, stealing a kiss at Gerald D. Hines Waterwall Park, or riding a tandem bike through Buffalo Bayou Park, try to have a great time celebrating love… rain or shine. .

(tags for translation) National Weather Service

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